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Jon LaDeau plays Way Station 11.30

Blues traditionalist, country revivalist, Jon LaDeau is taking Brooklyn to the genres usually reserved for Austin, Chicago and New Orleans. This is a truly down home American style, presented with grit... irony-free. His latest record sticks to these styles with glee as LaDeau's guitar work shreds like a latter-day Stevie Ray Vaughn. At times, his voice recalls the George Harrison from 'All Things Must Pass,' a rocker who still understands the roots of his sound. Tracks like 'Lucille' and 'Grapple' especially carry with them the railroad grooves of delta blues under jackhammer guitar licks. See him when he plays his ongoing residency at Way Station in Prospect Heights on November 30th. - Mike Levine (@Goldnuggets)

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Highlights from the female fronted NYC Tinderbox Festival: Jamie Bendell, Mal Blum, Charlene Kaye.

Back for its third year, Tinderbox Music Festival — entirely composed of female musicians and female-fronted bands — showcased this past Sunday a diverse amount of genres with acts from all over the country playing on 3 separate stages. The event started at 1pm with folkier bands taking the stage in the morning, including a stand out performance by NYC  Jamie Bendell (pictured and streaming), whose beautifully raw and innocent voice blended perfectly with catchy acoustic guitar riffs and a grittier sound from the back-up electric guitarist. Other standouts of the day included: Hello Phones, the powerful and punky ohian group Jasper the Colossal, the endearing and talented Mal Blum backed by drummer and guitarist, and one of the last bands of the day, the wonderfully energetic Charlene Kaye and the Brilliant Eyes. The headliner, Coco Rosie, ended the night with an emotional and experimental set that had the audience entranced. For more information on the festival or the musicians involved, go here. - Chelsea Eriksen - Photo credit: Maxime Lemoine

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Ghost Beach releases EP Modern Tongues + plays Music Hall on 12.08

The emergent Brooklyn sound in the aftermath era of lo-fi electro from successful acts such as Small Black and Violens seems to be bigger, bolder, more anthemic choruses. "Modern Tongues," the debut EP by Ghost Beach, goes one further, blurring the lines between disparate genres like yacht rock, electro-funk and (amazingly) boy band rubbish. The appropriately-titled EP starts out with “Miracle,” whose chiming guitar licks recall the Smiths, until singer Josh Laviolette unleashes a riotous chorus worthy of Rivers Cuomo’s most throat-shedding vocals. “Tear Us Apart,” the lead single from Modern Tongues, shimmers like Simple Minds at their medieval peak, layered over an industrial backbeat that feels defiantly current, despite its retro proclivities. “Been There Before” (streaming) is the EP’s best moment, a song of such joy and pathos that it’s destined to send live crowds through the roof. Clocking in at just under 22 minutes (five songs), I found myself running to start the whole EP over, as my living room crowd was having far too much fun to switch to something new just yet. To join the party see the band live at The Music Hall of Williamsburg on December 08. - Brian Chidester

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NYC artists on the rise: Sam Friend

Traveling peripatetically in his records almost as often as he moves to new locations, Sam Friend stumbles his way from genre to genre in the hope of achieving what might be called a quasi-emotional honky-tonk bliss. Like confessional rockers before him (think: Matthew Sweet or John McCauley), Sam Friend winds his songs up like a frustrated yo-yo, exploding into his tunes when his pent-up energy gets to be too wild.

A lot of his music has the feel of country-western saloon jams that have recently become acquainted with basement rock. Songs like ‘Bedlam’ and ‘High Hives’ from Sam’s new EP sampler ‘Spirit Mirrir’ push and shove against beer-soaked arrangements (including a handsomely dressed version of ‘On A Plain’) and surprising collaborators. Truly a trip worth taking.

For this artist who discovers some new trail to go down with each record, ‘Mirrir’ might be his biggest departure yet. Check it out on his bandcamp and see him when he plays next with his band The Freckles. - Mike Levine (@Goldnuggets) - This artist submitted music for review here

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Dark electro-rock from NYC: TV Baby

Neo-No Wave band TV Baby continue their onslaught of metal machine music with the summer 2012 single “New York Is Alright.” The duo (Matthew McAuley and Brain McPeck of downtown noise act A.R.E. Weapons) send up the city’s cultural (read: pretentious) aspirations with astute lyrics like: “New York is alright if you’re 12 years old sittin’ in your bedroom all alone at home dreaming about being Lou Reed or James Chance, doin’ some brand new 21st Century dance across the skyline of Manhattan where anything can happen.” TV Baby had a chance to play with Chance (a.k.a James White) at Don Hill’s (511 Greenwich Street) last year in support of their self-titled debut EP, itself a wild if derivative ode to No Wave pioneers like Suicide and the Bush Tetras. The duo’s squelching guitars and grimey synth sound took on ironic material by Bo Diddley, Little Richard and an echoey version of Chuck Berry’s “Mabelline” that was slowed down to reach maximum sensuality. Three years along, TV Baby have yet to transcend their obvious influences, but this latest single should be enough to keep interested parties, well, um, interested. - Brian Chidester

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