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Revival

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Wet Leather releases new track "I Was Wrong", plays Elsewhere 02.02

Though they identify their genre of indie music as "anxiety pop", Wet Leather return with confidence as they drop their newest single, "I Was Wrong". Drawing from '80s influences (Prince's ghost often dwells in their recordings) and indie elements of the '00s such as CHVRCHES' synths and poppy hooks, the group once again makes their mark in the NYC scene. Last week, they released another new song called "IWMU"; both that and "I Was Wrong" (streaming below) will appear on Wet Leather's upcoming EP, Present Lives. The group will release the EP and perform on February 2nd at Elsewhere's Zone 1. - Will Sisskind

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Java Jukebox call for justice on “Rise Up”

One defining piece of reggae music is social criticism, a major theme embedded within “Rise Up”, the newest single from Boston-based rocksteady's Java Jukebox. “Rise Up” is an exercise in classic dub form: a bass and drum driven arrangement, arpeggiated horn lines, tape delayed phrases (Rise Up! up...up...up...up), a dancehall breakdown, and of course, social criticism. Singer Samuel Walukouw, rallying in the cool rasp of a Marley, uses “Rise Up” as a call to action, specifically against police brutality; “Put your fist up high in the air, say you’re going to fight this brutality!” The heartfelt commentary and chops behind it all make the music of Java Jukebox truly authentic and unique in the dub-sparse city of Boston. Stream “Rise Up” below, and check out Java Jukebox at Brighton Music Hall on February 2nd. -Charley Ruddell

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Listen: The soulful stylings of Katie Matzell’s debut EP

Portland’s soulful pop songstress Katie Matzell grew up listening to a trove of oldies records kept in her basement, a stashed library of her father’s from his days as a DJ. She cites Bonnie Raitt and Aretha Franklin as two major influences, which comes at no surprise after listening to her smoothly rich self-titled debut EP. Matzell’s voice, both effortless and simple, floats above a sea of washy keys and pocket grooves, calling comparisons to not only her influences of the past, but to her contemporaries- Norah Jones and Emily King immediately come to mind. The six track EP covers plenty of musical ground, ranging from the heady neo-soul of “Brick Sidewalks”, to the dubious funk of “On the Line”, to the gospel-blues of “Don’t They Say”. Stream Katie’s EP below. -Charley Ruddell  

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Nation of Language brings the dark synthpop of the '80s to Elsewhere, 02.06

Nation of Language’s vision of the New Wave aesthetic feels seamlessly natural, a continuation of 1980's synthpop instead of just an experiment in nostalgia. The band has an advantage of hindsight that their musical inspirations did not, a position that allows Nation of Language to freely experiment in the nuanced area between New Wave and post-punk. Yet, the real delight that sets apart this group are Ian Devaney’s vocals. Devaney’s wistful crooning comes with a romantic dark side that cannot be ignored. Check out Nation of Language at Elsewhere (Zone One), 02.06. --Amanda Ogea





No Wave

Time: 
20:00
Band name: 
TV Baby
FULL Artist Facebook address (http://...): 
https://www.facebook.com/pg/tvbabyusa/about/?ref=page_internal
Venue name: 
Baby's All Right
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