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Psych

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Olden Yolk Debuts Video "Vital Sign," Plays Union Pool 02.24

Olden Yolk’s music bursts into paisley waves of freak folk splendor. Their upcoming self-titled LP focuses their aesthetic through a fish-eye lens, shaping a more mature sound that fully utilizes Caity Shaffer’s dark, velvety vocals (her band-mate Shane Butler also sings in the album). Shaffer’s voice mesmerizes best in Olden Yolk’s newly released video for “Vital Sign,” an homage that evokes Nico, Twiggy, and technicolor visions of the ‘60s. Sink into Olden Yolk’s wonderland with 02.23’s LP premiere and a performance at Union Pool on 02.24. -- Amanda Ogea





Psych

Time: 
20:00
Band name: 
Violets Are Wet
FULL Artist Facebook address (http://...): 
https://www.facebook.com/violetsarewet/
Venue name: 
Mercury Lounge
Band email: 
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Veda Rays host Tuesday residency at Sunnyvale in February

Since premiering their first new track since 2014 here on the Deli this past September, Brooklyn's Veda Rays have been hard at work.  They released five song Shadow Side EP in November, as well as a second video for “False Coloured Eyes” (streaming below). In the video, the band is shown playing via a four way split screen, while lead vocalist James delivers his dramatic lyrical recitation through full screen edits.   The track hearkens back to the darker side of '80s second wave of post punk British bands, where synths and guitars merge with dark sounding, almost ominous vocals. The band will host a four night residency every Tuesday in February at Sunnyvale, where all the shows are completely free and feature many emerging NYC bands. In addition to the live performance the events will also feature photo & art exhibits, short film projections and spoken word performances. (photo by Julia Stibal) - Dave Cromwell

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New Very Bad Vibes LP Available for Streaming & Purchase

Very Bad Vibes, a.k.a. Sam Huntington, recently dropped his second album House and Home. Huntington explores personal depths, revealing intriguing, self-conscience awareness. That candid openness, coupled with consistently adventurous, groove-anchored instrumentation, paints a fun/fragile dynamic. Enlisting former Original Crooks and Nannies bandmate Madeline Rafter (Snake Boy Gang) for a little vocal duty, the album zooms in close, but can’t stand still. Very Bad Vibes is slated to appear alongside Coping Skills, Candy Boys, and Julia Rainer on Wednesday, February 21 at Tralfamadore.

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The Deli Philly’s February Record of the Month: Johnny Utah – Johnny Utah

Johnny Utah’s limited edition self-titled cassette is quintessential listening for fans of bedroom pop, earnest lyricism, and melodies that feel like the soundtrack to your favorite early aughts indie flick.

Available via Slovakian cassette label Z Tapes, the six-song EP opens with “Angst,” which unfolds with melodic licks of guitar and the distant trill of birds. The hushed yet cinematic intro gradually blossoms into a satisfyingly more pronounced and rhythmically memorable ballad that asks a timely question: “Is it time for the world to see?” Heartfelt yet far from coy, “Angst” feels genuine, nostalgic, and fervent. It’s a suitable preface to “Gentle Boy,” which begins with the definition of its namesake, setting the stage for an unabashed and tender anthem that pays homage to vulnerability and emotion, while resulting in a realistic portrait of masculinity. The song ends with a heartwarming voicemail message that gives a vivid glimpse into the would-be biography of man not afraid to give a shit or say, “I love you.” It’s a refreshing meditation on human closeness and self-actualization.

The lullaby-esque start of “Elliot’s Song” echoes the beginning of “Angst” in its earliest moments, before evolving into a catchy confessional about intimacy and an inability to let go of a romance. Reminiscent of the raw truth at the center of bygone LPs by Drug Rug and The Babies, the track transforms its narrator into a believable apologist. It’s difficult to listen to this song without seeing a bit of yourself in it. Rather than mere desperation, “Elliot’s Song” is a sincere proclamation, while “Her Bangs” is a brief yet swoon-worthy offering that hums with yearning. A perfect song to be listened to again and again due to its brevity, “Her Bangs” illustrates Johnny Utah’s lyrical precision and the longevity of being concise. Within the span of barely two minutes, listeners are captivated by the clarity of the track’s narrative and sentiments. “Nvrllyrlly” is an undeniably smooth, pop cut. A testament to the persistence of desire, the urgency of the song is amplified by repetition and the pulsating thumps of a drum machine.

Johnny Utah’s final track, the aptly titled “A Song to End It All,” begins like a trippy, psych-drenched, fever dream in slo-mo, before bursting into a tambourine-filled hymn of sorts. A seamless end to a gratifying cassette, “A Song to End It All” and all that precedes it are well worth listening to on repeat. Each track will feel just as riveting as it did the first time you heard it. – Dianca London

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