x
the_deli_magazine

This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


Go to the old Top 300 charts

Cancel

Node Pic

Orchestral

Node Pic



Aakash Sridhar assembles serious talent in new single "Road to Oman"

Featuring a cast of talented musicians such as Joey Rosin, Art Baden, Pritesh Walia, Ron Cha, Masaaki Saito, and Aman Jagwani, the talents of composer Aakash Sridhar are evident in his latest single “Road to Oman.” The 6-minute piece is a riveting tale told with the class that only intricate instrumentation that includes graceful piano leads, complex basslines, and soft cymbal hits could provide. The sonic story is tailored for a unique listener experience: each individual can take from the music his or her own set of memories-sparked, wrapped in silky-smooth saxophone embellishments. For a Tuesday afternoon and beyond, “Road to Oman” fits; stream the single below for a taste of real class, and wait for that guitar majesty at the 5-minute mark. - René Cobar

Node Pic



A Deli Premiere: "A Step Back from the Wrong Direction" by Josh Knowles

Boston’s Josh Knowles gives sound to a time filled with tragedies, abysmal confusion, and above all else, profound hope for a better world. In his new record, A Step Back from the Wrong Direction, Josh uses his skills with an electric violin to craft evocative string music that stimulates the heart and mind with each swell and beautiful cadence. “A Step Back from the Wrong Direction: II” is a prime example of the ambiances the music immerses the listener in, cautious, almost as if stepping stealthily, the song creates a sense of peril that is both grave and familiarly comfortable. “A Step Back from the Wrong Direction: IV” seems more cheery, almost like the calm after a raging storm, back and forth the sounds rise like sea spume so majestic. Overall, Josh Knowles offers New England the kind of music that makes the most sense today: a type of music meant for contemplation, discovery, and healing. We are thrilled to premiere the record for you below; your weekend will be the better for it. - Rene Cobar

Node Pic



Mare Berger's arresting chamber pop expands on "The Moon Is Full," new LP out 5.26

Much like its lunar namesake, “The Moon Is Full” waxes gradually from the quiet piano and somber vocal performance of singer-songwriter Mare Berger to full chamber-pop instrumentation, becoming luminescent while maintaining a central, melancholy energy. The track, centered around Berger’s vox and lyricism, details the “sudden loss of a loved one and the pain and healing that comes after,” its impassioned theme amplified by the track’s increasingly expansive instrumentation — “I pray that the seed will grow,” Berger sings, their voice becoming more confident, transitioning from raw pain to acceptance as cinematic background strings expand in a flush of raw emotion. Dramatically-rendered yet wholly human, it’s an arresting effort, one that promises more raw, orchestral offerings on Berger’s forthcoming LP The Moon is Always Full, out June 5th — until then, stream the single below. Photo by Ilusha Tsinazde

|
Node Pic



PREMIERE: Bandits on the Run soundtrack modern love in new short film "Love in the Underground"

The baroque-pop sensibilities of New York trio Bandits on the Run well make for cinematic music — with vivacious cello lines intertwining with acoustic guitar, and three part harmonies as a centerpiece, there’s a goosebumps-inducing element to their tunes, a plethora of hair-raising moments wherein the band’s distinct parts emerge from quietude into a full, sunny sound. It’s fitting then that their newest single, “Love in the Underground,” was released alongside a nine minute short film for which the track serves as score (and in which the band serves as background players), enabling listeners and viewers to become swept up by the band’s dynamic, driving performance. Visually charting two strangers (actors Jason Gotay and Michael Hartung, themselves a couple IRL) falling in love on the subway, their dialogue is told primarily through choreography and music, a conversation which spans several station stops along the L and the East Williamsburg streets, before settling in at an atmospheric speakeasy — where the film visually enters its second act. Transitioning from an upbeat, primarily string-forward approach to the tone of a piano-driven ballad, Bandits on the Run re-emerge in the bar to perform a slower, more somber rendition of the track, creating a visual and sonic B-side to the entire production that builds to this featurette’s heartfelt climax. An impressive endeavor by any metric, aided by production from veteran companies Chucklehead and Must B Nice and choreography from co-director Lane Halperin, it’s required, sweetly succinct viewing in a time where love might seem far away — though it could just be one train car over. Watch it below. Photo by Fletcher Wolfe

|
Node Pic



PREMIERE: Green and Glass's debut is mystic chamber-pop, play Threes Brewing 3.4

It’s rare that a record is able to capture a perfect balance of forward momentum and somber reflection, yet this is precisely what New York avant-pop ensemble Green and Glass have accomplished on their debut full length. Such conflicting feelings are likely a product of the band’s methodical instrumentation, the joining of parts from the old world (harps, horns, and drums) and the new (keys and electric bass), which as set pieces for bandleader Lucia Stavros’ show-stealing, often mysterious lyricism, creates an intergenerational atmosphere — chamber pop that feels as modern as it does baroque. This tone is set early in the record on “Green and Glass” and “14 Hours,” whose march-like tempos, somber brass lines and cool synths serve as distinctive introductory fanfares; while the song’s formats may seem familiar at first, the script is immediately upended by the band’s diverse instrumental offerings. This energy continues throughout standout track “Sand,” where the unison of harp and electric guitar against a stuttering percussive line paves the way for an ethereal overture that perfectly blends woodwind and midi leads. In all, Green and Glass delights and surprises at every turn, a lush, experimental yet accessible record that will feel immediately at home with fans of San Fermin or Hundred Waters — stream our premiere below, and catch the band at Threes Brewing on March 4th for their record release show. Photo by Maura McGee

|
|
|

- news for musician and music pros -

Loading...