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This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


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Folk/Country

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Elizabeth Moen "It'll Get Tired Too"

Elizabeth Moen has released the latest single, "It'll Get Tired Too" from her forthcoming EP, "Creature of Habit", which is set to be released on December 11th. Moen is a newly Chicago-based, Iowa Native, who brings with her a rich, emotive voice that is sure to stand out in our city.

The new single is accompanied by a Joshua De Lanoit animated lyric video that can be viewed below.

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Sara Noelle debuts serene cover of "Emerald River Dance"

L.A’s Sara Noelle offers us her atmospheric take on Judee Sill’s “Emerald River Dance” and does the popularly covered song justice. The track is a weaving of swelling tones and nature-oriented rhythms that create a serene soundscape that is soothing for troubled minds. Noelle’s vocals have an elegance to them and emotional precision that wholly create a version of the song that belongs to her. With piano-key trickles and pulsing synths, the cover has a heartbeat of its own, and it is worth listening to; stream Sara Noelle’s cover of “Emerald River Dance” below for an ambiance to enjoy. - René Cobar

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Single Premiere: Red Spot Rhythm Section

We are proud to be able to premiere the new single from Red Spot Rhythm Section, “Hard to Give Thanks" B/W "Foundation”. This is the folk and reggae fusion outlet of Joshua Siegal, and for this single he has enlisted the guest talents of Shane Jonas (Akasha, Lowdown Brass Band) on vocals, Mike Bruno (Spare Parts) on drums, and Michael Bizar (AJ Croce) on lead guitar.

This is Siegal's first new single since 2018 and it was partially recorded remotely after their scheduled studio time was cancelled back in March.

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East of June raises hope in new single "Little Bird"

East of June is paying tribute to adventure with a new single titled “Little Bird” that describes the to-be journey of a young girl searching for her voice, her awaiting identity. Tucked in the rich lead vocal melody of Emily Rath is a story of discovery that is relatable. The warm groove from the bass of Incubus founding member Dirk Lance leads the rhythm that helps also tell the story, with Kyle Mortensen providing the acoustics, it is a win. The group shot the music video for the song on Long Canyon Trail in beautiful Simi Valley, adding just the kind of tranquil mood that the song inspires. Such reflections come from the track’s moment of birth (the first week of quarantine), and so loaded with hope, “Little Bird” merges the past and the future and infuses hope and respect for both; stream “Little Bird” for a story familiar. - René Cobar 

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Wood and Wire Release "No Matter Where It Goes from Here"

 

Austin’s Wood and Wire have taken great use of the quarantine and provided some much needed relief with their September release No Matter Where It Goes from Here.

Trevor Smith rings the banjo beautifully on the opening track “John” as the harmonies of Tony Kamel and Billy Bright resonate in your chest. It’s a passionate take on “seekers, searchers and drifters” where “livin’ ain’t easy when you don’t have money, but money means nothing when you ain’t livin’ free.” The harmonies really drive the song home with the same passion of a Zac Brown or Chris Stapelton ballad.

“Can’t Keep Up” is a dance around in the morning song, which really brings the group back to an outdoor festival feeling of carefree summers and iced tea on the front porch.

“Pigs” is a serious driving track that brings some grit and also reintroduces the theme of money. The first verse concludes “pigs don’t fly, we’re all gonna die and you can’t take your money to the grave.” Kamel sings about a televangelist looking for donations and critiques “it’s a funny world we’re livin’ in full of lies...”

Peter Rowan guests on the track “Rodie’s Circles” and the band truly shows their speed and accuracy in their craft. It has the pace and organic sound of a David Grisman instrumental.

Money continues to be a faint theme that holds the album together with “Spirit of ‘94.” The soft singing on “Home and the Banjo” revives the summer feeling of a John Denver song on the radio. There’s a skipping vibe on “Peddlewheels” that puts a smile on your face.

Wood and Wire have done an excellent job with an enthusiastic release that takes use of the different forms of popular bluegrass structures that can bring many different emotions into the mind of the listener.

 

-Andrew Blanton

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